Simple And Affordable Tips For Preserving The Value And Usability Of Your Auto

Many people simply drive their cars from day to day without every having solid maintenance plans in place. Instead, they deal with issues as they crop up. This certainly isn’t the most effective way to avoid serious malfunction and it definitely isn’t the most affordable either. Following are a few inexpensive and easy strategies that you can use to preserve the overall value and usability of your automobile.

Start investing in the highest quality fuel available in your area. These products will cost a bit more, but they will have less sediment and other additions that can clog up your engine. You should also use an engine cleaner several times per month. This goes right into the tank along with your fuel and will ensure that the fuel burns a bit cleaner.

Make a habit of washing your car every weekend. This is something that you can cheaply do on your own at home. It can also be a very cathartic and relaxing activity. Certain forms of debris that get stuck on the paint and your auto glass will be a lot easier to remove if you catch them before they have a chance to harden under the heat and rays of the sun. Keep a small vacuum in your car along with a cleaning spray and cloths so that you can wipe up spills and other messes as they occur.

Invest in seat covers and heavy duty floor mats. These things are especially important to have on hand if you live in or regularly travel through a very muddy or dusty area. They will protect the underlying carpeting and upholstery from damages or stains. If you ever choose to sell your car, your seats and floors will look brand new.

Have your oil changed every three to six months depending upon how much your drive. Also, schedule a tune-up at least twice per year. Pencil these things into your wall calendar or set the dates for service on your phone. These services are incredibly low in cost and they can prevent small problems from spiraling out of control.

When accessories and other decorative elements start to break, take your vehicle to a car detailing shop right away. Problems like these detract from the aesthetic and monetary value of your ride and will make your vehicle less marketable. You also have the option of upgrading broken or damaged parts like these by working with aftermarket sellers. Your detail shop can perform all necessary installations for you.

Choosing Waxes And Polishes For Marine Detailing and Boat Cleaning

What types of waxes and polishes make the most sense for a boat detailing and yacht cleaning start-up service business? This is a loaded question for many reasons, first, it depends on the temperature when applying, the training of the crew member using the product and the cost of the products chosen (remember you are in business to maximize profits). Okay so let’s talk shall we?

You see, not long ago a new marine sector cleaning service entrepreneur called me and wanted a more definite answer to this tough question of waxes and polishes, so let me share this communication with you, as this information might also be of at least some value to you in your boat cleaning business.

“So just to clarify what would be your top go to choice of polish for gel coats? I plan on using the magic buff as compound and wax mainly, being that there are so many options for polishers, and is there any specific liquid wax you could recommend for the cockpit for like a final touch after the cleaning to give it that shine look”

I reiterated that I do not have a specific choice, I’d base it on the types of vessels I’d most be cleaning. If I am in a warmer climate in a marina with mostly nice boats, I’d use “Seal It” by AutoMagic or “Diamond Shine” by New American and not use a polishing compound at all. If I had to use a polishing compound I’d start with Finesse by 3M and work up their line based on how bad it was. 3M products are usually available close by, and I’d hate to stock too much product I may not use very often. If you plan on doing lots of boats that are problematic, maybe even specializing in that, then I’d keep more on hand. The nice thing about Magic Buff seems to be its versatility, thus, I think you are making a good choice. For cockpits, I really like the polymer-solvent waxes, nice on plastics, glass, fiberglass, etc.

That’s kind of where I sit, again, this is personal preference stuff, sometimes you have to try out a few products and see what you end up liking. Every operator needs to weigh the costs of the products with their quality and ease of use, also with their own preferences and understand the skill level of their crew members. There is no right or wrong answer on this, each detailer will have a different take on it. Still, the products I mentioned are easy to use and readily available. Please consider this.

Boat Detailing – Skills, Competition And Pricing

The questions I get asked most about boat, vessel and yacht cleaning and detailing always seem to fall into 3-categories. Folks want to know about what type of training they need, how much they should charge and marketing to get the most business and beat the competition. That makes sense right?

Sure it does, every entrepreneur in any service business will want to have these questions answered and learn all they can in these categories, who can blame them – they have money on the line, lots of time involved and they want to be successful and make a profit. Okay so, let’s go through some of my recent questions – as you too maybe asking the same.

The first one relates to self-assessment, always a good idea – Do I have the skills needed for this business, and do I have the right equipment to optimize my time and do the job right. Here is the question:

“As for my skill set with a buffer; I’m very good with it and have actually set up to compound 2 of my friends boats for free just to see what works best. I plan on ordering the dual action Shurhold orbital buffers.”

Indeed, this sounds like the right plan to practice using compound so you get an idea of exactly how to do it and when you’ve gone too far and are close to burning the paint. I agree that dual action style orbital buffers are best when it comes to orbitals. There is a big difference in quality of orbital buffers.

Regarding: Competition

“Shopped around a bit today calling various businesses in the market in my (area) although there seems to really only be 1-2 major companies around being that I’m on an island. I am trying to establish a range of pricing. Seems to be a challenge going to have to put in more time and research before I come up with a figure, I’ve learned being the Cheapest can often scare off people so I need to find a middle range where my prices are just above what people would call ‘cheap’.”

Yes, with higher-end clientele you do yourself – it is no good to try to be the Wal-Mart of the marine detailing industry, it defeats the purpose of all your marketing and perception of quality in the customer’s minds. The trick is to portray that at every turn, not only with your finished product, but also with plenty of referrals quotes on your website, and digital “Before-After” pictures so people can SEE the Difference prior to committing to a full-blown detail on their pride and joy (vessel).